Blogtalk Downunder
   May 19-22, Sydney

23/11/2005

Blog Hui 2006 - Be there!!!

Filed under: General — James @ 3:00 pm

Well, what with Blogtalk Reloaded being announced for Vienna in October 2006 it’s a pretty exciting time (again!) in the world of Blogging Conferences because Blog Hui: New Zealand’s First International Blogging Conference has also just been launched by the ever resourceful and ridiculously energetic Lynsey Gedye.


It looks like it’s going to be absolutely excellent with international speakers including Torill Mortensen, Trevor Romain and the one and only Mark Bernstein!

I’ll definitely be trying to get to this as well… now there’s a drawcard ;)


Here’s the call for papers (or posters!)
, in summary:

• Case studies of local experiences in implementing blogging technologies
• Blogitics - blogging as a political tool – activism online
• Blogging the arts: Web 2.0 independent music publishing, photographers, and artists
• Personal blogs and portals
• Blogging with a conscience - blogging to make a difference
• Portfolio blogging – promoting, presenting, and protecting your creativity
• Developing blog-based teaching materials, resources and techniques
• Fear and loathing in the long tail - managing your public life online
• Blog writing style
• Collaborative blogging
• Making money with your blog
• Desk top blogging – fine publishing from home
• Building your community and traffic, connecting with your tribe in the blogosphere
• Blogging on the intranet – blogging in the office
• Traditional PR, marketing and the “blogosphere”
• Theoretical and conceptual reviews, technical reviews
• Social networking tools, blogging tools, aggregation and technology: RSS, XML, podcasting and video blogging

Please, if you can, spread the word on this one… it’s kinda the natural successor to Blogtalk Downunder and is as good an excuse as any I reckon for a trip to beautiful NZ and Wellington!

21/6/2005

Implications of culture

Filed under: General — Ash @ 9:00 pm

I was fascinated by Thomas Burg’s talk (and the fortuitously timed comments that matched the projectors tantrums).

Something I thought was pertinent but not mentioned was the cultural dimension. Assuming that this project was launched in Germany, a supposedly monochronic society of low context, that excels in linear, heirarchical and compartmentalised work practices - perhaps the technology wasn’t the main flaw? What if the culture just didn’t suit the concept?

As part of his theories on monochronic and low context peoples, Edward T. Hall purported that German society encourages workers to do their work and in general, “keep their head down”. They apparently favour adhering to time, and budgets over deep relationships to achieve goals in work. On the other hand, high context, polychronic societies such as the French, or certain Asian and Mediterranean areas, lean more toward relationships. The more people you know - and know well - the more you can achieve. Why wait in a line when you can call a friend?

Perhaps these polychronic societies would be a better test bed for technologyLog?

Chris Chesher’s slides for Blogs and the Return of the Author

Filed under: General — chris.chesher @ 9:00 pm

I’ve uploaded my slides as a PDF file.

31/5/2005

Blue USB Stick

Filed under: General — James @ 9:45 pm

One last call to see if anyone ended up by accident with a blue USB stick… if so please get in touch to reunite it with it’s owner!

G’Day World - The Blogtalk Downunder Sessions

Filed under: General — James @ 10:02 am

Mick has started posting the G’Day World BDU sessions. The first one is Andrew Bartlett’s presentation. Go grab the G’Day World feed to keep up to date!

30/5/2005

A continuation on a theme… to get rid of comments or to keep them

Filed under: General — James @ 1:24 pm

Inspired by the discussion Mark Bernstein got going at the conference abut comments I’ve just posted the first of a two-parter entitled Arguments for getting rid of comments.

The second part will be arguing the opposite… subscribe to the Blogsavvy RSS feed to pick it up.

27/5/2005

The late blogger

Filed under: General — Mathieu @ 3:34 pm

Hi there - better late than never right? OK, I’m now officially posting some comments on the conference. I guess I’m just not a real hardcore blogger - oh well. Cheers everyone, it was nice to meet you all!

26/5/2005

10 Things I learnt - or re-learnt from Trevor!

Filed under: General — ABB @ 5:42 pm

Trevor Cook - one of our engaging presenters and active participants has posted his list of learnings - 10 of them actually!
Nicely put - thanks Trevor!

25/5/2005

Missing NetComm wireless card

Filed under: General — ABB @ 10:47 am

And just to add to Lawrence’s previous post - we are also missing a wireless NetComm card that would have given you access to the iBurst hotspot during the conference.
If you inadvertently dashed off with it (or have forgotten it’s in your laptop) - can you let me know, please…..we are responsble for returning all the equipment to iBurst and will have to re-imburse them for any missing or damaged items!
Thanks - Anne BB

24/5/2005

Missing USB Memory Stick

Filed under: General — sank @ 11:29 pm

Hello all. My name is Lawrence Sank, Product Manager for iBurst - we provided the wireless hotspot for the Conference. On Friday May 20 I gave a presentation on iBurst Wireless Broadband and left my Sony 512MB USB Memory Stick behind. It is blue/grey attached to a HP lanyard. If anyone knows where it is please can you call me on 0413 620 989. Thanks much appreciated. Regards Lawrence

Graffiti is OK - BlogTalk DownUnder

Filed under: General — Leigh @ 8:59 pm

Hmmm, this is my first time in wordpress and I have a funny feeling that I’m about to post something on the BlogTalk front page! I just wanted to let you guys know I’ve written up some thoughts about Saturday’s presentations.

getting access to thomas berg’s technologylog

Filed under: General, Program — jane @ 4:30 pm

Hi,
this is probably a dumb question but I can’t manage to leave my email address as requested on Thomas’s link to get access to his site.
Can anyone help?

Thanks very much
Jane Connors

Conference Commentary!

Filed under: General — James @ 12:29 pm

A big thankyou to Michael Specht who has provided pretty amazing blow by blow commentary from the sessions over at his blog! There’s even a category for it… wondrous stuff :o)

Blogtalking, walking, gawking and reporting

Filed under: General — James @ 11:37 am

Well, it’s Tuesday so that means I’ve had the compulsory ‘at least a day out’ to feel like I can actually reflect (rather than just react) to the conference so I thought I’d give it a shot.

It’s be great if other people felt that they could reflect here as well (as some have) but feel free to trackback, pingback, commentback or post a link to reflection on your own blog as well… I’ll disable the registration option at the end of this week so now’s your time!

For me, themes which came up in conversation and presentation were many and varied although there was definitely some significant showing in talking about blogs in the community, sustainability, collective / individual authorship, future archiving use, blogs in education, citizen science & participatory culture and, of course, protection & comments.

Phew, I’d link to each paper / example if I could but am still pretty tired!

In terms of the conference itself I as pretty happy with the venue, delighted by the invited speakers, comfy with the wireless and cool with the blogwalk. To improve… I think we could’[ve subverted the presentation mode a bit more (where appropriate), considered the ‘paper to present’ mode to open it up somewhat, employed / cajoled some good PR / marketing help and have had a back-up projector before 9:30 on the Thursday!!!

The things that I’m most happy with is that a lot of interesting things I reckon have been set in motion over the last few days and that, in my book, the fully & freely available conference papers constitute one of the best and most significant public collections of academic discourse and discussion into weblogs. And that wouldn’t necessarily have happened if it hadn’t been for the conference (which makes me smile).

Lots more cogitations to follow for sure but that’ll do for the moment.

23/5/2005

Blogwalk and things

Filed under: General — derek @ 10:27 am

Well, another blogwalk has been and gone. If I’d known what a blogwalk was I’d have gone, but that’s life; up until Sunday it was all a bit of a mystery to me. I did locate by accident the blogwalk site on Saturday, but merely stashed it on my Firefox toolbar to look at later. Pity really, as seeing who ran the site would have saved an embarrassing question to Sebastian on Sunday morning after breakfast as we sat in the middle of a huge field discussing the meaning of bloglife . . . The queston was . . .

“Have you ever been on a blogwalk?” :-|

Here is a picture of the fine looking Blogwalk bunch whom I passed on the sidewalk while snapping the urban grafitti and human life of the area . . .

Blogwalk
The image has been treated of course to comply with the privacy and publishing laws of Canada, the US, Aussie and New Zealand, but probably not Ubekistahn. This is to protect the identity and location information in the original snap. It is a nice snap, and if anyone wants a copy they can e-mail me. :-)

I have returned to an alternate reality, not online and full of things I must do. Returned quite late actually (we had a medical emergency on the plane and had to divert to Auckland, got in at 3.30 rather than 12.00 midnight.)

I will add this blog to my feeds. Quite a nice little cadre of papers from Blogtalk DU. This was great. I came asking what we needed to do for our country. I am going to start with an invite to all bloggers living in my suburb to coffee, human interfacing and computers at the local library. Hpe to get some cat bloggers, local environment freaks and the local MP. [Will worry about the rest of NZ later]

Hey everyone, it was nice to meet you, even in the paucity of time for chat, it was good. I have a follow up list of 8 writers and many websites . . .

Anne and James - I hope you feel pleased, it was well worth doing. I trust you recover soon. :-) Many thanks. - D

22/5/2005

Katie is still having technical difficulties

Filed under: General — KC @ 4:25 pm

Please stand by… Greetings all. My presentation on blogs and life narrative is graphics heavy and I am currently unable to upload it. Once I get back to Adelaide (Tuesday) I will make a streamlined version to place on this site. Thank you all for your interesting discussions, and I hope we keep the dialogue going. Please feel free to contact me at Flinders University.

21/5/2005

Return of the Author Slides

Filed under: General — chris.chesher @ 4:59 pm

I’ve uploaded the slides from my talk (which I retitled this morning as ‘Blogs and the Return of the Author’) (PDF file).

Blogtalkers may also be interested in a seminar my Department (Arts Informatics at University of Sydney) is hosting on June 2 called ‘Learning from Free Software’. More details here. It’s free, but you have to RSVP.

More photos

Filed under: General — James @ 4:35 pm

There are some more photos in the flickr stream!

Gavin’s Course

Filed under: General — derek @ 2:32 pm

I was interested in seeing some real student blogs. I googled KIB809 which is one of gavn’s courses and quickly found a raft of them. Lots of comments about how students are feeling about the course. You sure would get a good feel for what’s ‘working’ and what’s not.
Some quite deep reflections at times. Looks lke lots of fun. I wondr if we could use some sort of tagging functions to tag posts of ‘value’ for asessment purposes. Clck - view al the posts we have noticed that may contribute to a grade.
Or do we get students to provide the view. (In portfolio?)
I also found the essay/blog comparisons interesting. When we di our blogging-dabbling last year we let an anything goes plicy aply (in coparison to the discussin board stuff that is much more formal) Well done Gavin!!

Our slides - Portfolio Building in Chinese Language Learning Using Blogs

Filed under: General — TAN Yuh Huann @ 2:19 pm

It really gives us great pleasure to share our experience with everyone here at the conference. Here’s our slides, and we welcome further discussion and exchange of ideas. Thanks to one and all and cheerio! :)

Keep on tagging…

Filed under: General — marc @ 11:47 am

As with the Flickr, and Technorati sites, check out links saved to del.icio.us/tag/blogtalkdownunder

Mark’s presentation

Filed under: General — mspecht @ 11:40 am

A very interesting presentation, it certainly has generated a lot of interesting comments and ideas from the group. Just the sort of thing you want from a speaker get us all thinking and make us step out of our “comfort zone”.

faster neater sharper

Filed under: General — jenny @ 10:55 am

Well, I just couldn’t do a podcast. I got terribly bogged down in aesthetics, and I couldn’t decide what appropriate level of quality and editing was right for it. Plus, I haven’t really had enough time. But more the first point: I haven’t got a sense of the appropriate podcast aesthetics. I haven’t exposed myself to enough podcasts to decide how I want to do it… So I have done a .mov of my powerpoint. There is some different stuff in the powerpoint than in the paper, so there is some sort of reason to do it.

(more…)

Mark Bernstein - Podcast “Protecting the Blogosphere’

Filed under: General — James @ 10:00 am

Several presenters have been able to put together podcasts to support their presentations.

Here’s Mark Bernstein’s and can I recommend that if you listen to one podcast this, week, month or year… this should be it.

This is exactly what I’m thinking of doing with edublogs.org

Tags and Technorati

Filed under: General — timbomb @ 9:29 am

So, lots of people talked about Technorati yesterday. One of the newer things the Technorati engine can do is look for things tagged with the same word, which means that all the people blogging and flickr-ing and del.icio.us-ing about Blogtalk Downunder collectively build a page like this when they use the ‘blogtalkdownunder’ tag.

Keyword tagging is a decentralised means of categorising more cheaply, but its also a way to “facilitate serendipity”, weaving together conversations more easily than with referrer logs and trackback.

Or that’s what I reckon.

20/5/2005

tag away…

Filed under: General — timbomb @ 11:10 pm

So, I noticed that the organisers were posting pictures to Flickr using the tag blogtalkdownunder. This struck me as very sensible, so I posted my two lousy phonecam pics with the same tag. Y’all should follow suit!

While you’re at it, why not bookmark relevant web pages with the same tag at del.icio.us?

My slides

Filed under: General — marcus @ 10:01 pm

It’s been a great day at Blogtalk DU. Lots of stimulating papers. As I said at the begining of my talk what really struck me was the notion of emerging contiuums of blogging practice and the tensions that emerge at the polar ends of these spectrums: the utopic on the one hand and the pragmatic on the other; the professional and the amateur; the intensely personal to the intensely networked; enthusiasms and disapointments; visionary early adopters moving into the first stream of mainstreamers. This is part of the emergent field. These are the creative tensions that we work with.

Look forward to more discussion tomorrow.

My Powerpoint

Implications of culture

Filed under: General — Ash @ 6:19 pm

I was fascinated by Thomas Burg’s talk (and the fortuitously timed comments that matched the projectors tantrums).

Something I thought was pertinent but not mentioned was the cultural dimension. Assuming that this project was launched in Germany, a supposedly monochronic society of low context, that excels in linear, heirarchical and compartmentalised work practices - perhaps the technology wasn’t the main flaw? What if the culture just didn’t suit the concept?

As part of his theories on monochronic and low context peoples, Edward T. Hall purported that German society encourages workers to do their work and in general, “keep their head down”. They apparently favour adhering to time, and budgets over deep relationships to achieve goals in work. On the other hand, high context, polychronic societies such as the French, or certain Asian and Mediterranean areas, lean more toward relationships. The more people you know - and know well - the more you can achieve. Why wait in a line when you can call a friend?

Perhaps these polychronic societies would be a better test bed for technologyLog?

Waffle

Filed under: General — derek @ 6:14 pm

Just fnishing listening to Glen and Marcus. Lots of interesting thoughts and ideas. Is anyne interested in taking lnch down to the lower level near the water tomorow and chatting about blog uses in courses in education. Sharing ideas and stories. (Nothing much more demandng than that!!)
And - anyone doing anything with wikis??
-Derek

‘Centred Communication’ or ‘your intranet is like Canberra’ presentation

Filed under: General — James @ 5:14 pm

Here are the slides and audio recordings for my presentation.

Apologies for the terrible formatting.

Hope you enjoy… and no, I’ve never been there :D

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